Tag Archives: Intensive Diabetes Management

Are There Different Types of Metformin? Diabetes and Metformin

Can metformin cause high blood sugar? No, it can’t. Diabetes drug metformin acts by decreasing production of glucose in the liver, decreasing glucose absorption, and diabetes medication metformin increasing glucose uptake into skeletal muscle. Can you take metformin with insulin? Yes, you can. But why would you? If you have symptoms of type 2 diabete s and ready to use insulin, you are much better off going onn intensive diabetes management.

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Intensive Sugar Diabetes Management

The purpose of intensive sugar diabetes management is to maintain normal blood glucose levels or as close to normal (non-diabetic) levels as posiible. The taget range of the blood sugar levels in the intensive sugar diabetes management is set to 75-125 mg/dl before meals. Main idea behind intensive sugar diabetes management is when blood glucose is maintained at lower levels consistently over the years, the risk of developing the long-term complications of sugar diabetes is significantly reduced. For children with Type 1 diabetes this becomes increasingly important once puberty has begun.

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Managing Type 2 Diabetes with Insulin

Managing Type 2 diabetes is certainly not an easy undertaking. Diabetes diasease has the progressive nature and nearly all people with Type 2 diabetes will eventually require insulin injections to keep their blood glucose levels under control. Type 2 diabetes is in no way “a simple form of diabetes” as many may think.

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Glucagon Like Peptide 1 Incretin Hormone. What is Glucagon Like Peptide 1?

Excessive food intake in patients with diabetes disease who are unable to reach normal body blood sugar level is thought to result in the production of incretin-antagonist hormones, leading to glucose intolerance and dysregulated insulin production in the pancreas. How to control blood sugar level. To control sugar level in blood body need to produce enough insulin to utilize excessive sugar. What is glucagon like peptide 1? Incretin hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide are hormones released from the small intestines in response to ingested food. Control of blood glucose levels works through join forces of insulin and glucagon like peptide 1 hormones.

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Intensive Diabetes Management and Diabetes Complications

Following the awarding of the Nobel Prize in medicine (1923) for the discoverers of insulin, Dr, Elliott Joslin predicted that the era of the coma as the central problem of diabetes would give way to the era of diabetes complications. No longer are patients with diabetes dying of diabetic ketoacidosis, insulin has allowed people with diabetes to live longer. Many of this individuals who are not aggressively managed, especially from the onset of diabetes, will develop diabetes complications that are costly to themselves as well as to society. The era of death from diabetic coma was transformed into an era of death from diabetes complications by the discovery of insulin.

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Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes. Intensive Management of Type 2 Diabetes

Intensive diabetes management is a much better choice for a person with Type 2 sugar diabetes that traditional treatment approach with oral diabetes medication. Diabetes is a progressive disease and recent study demonstrated that over time person’s glycemic control worsens no matter what kind of oral diabetes medication is used or what treatment regimen applied. Of the more than five thousand individuals who participated in the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study, only 9 percent were able to maintain an A1C less than 7 percent after 9 years with lifestyle improvement and diabetes diet compared with 12 percent of the metformin and 17 percent of the sulfonylurea individuals. With time insulin resistance becomes more severe and nearly all patients with Type 2 diabetes will eventually require insulin injections to achieve targeted A1C level of less than 7 percent.

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Food Role in Intensive Diabetes Management

With intensive diabetes management you are able to adjust your therapy to suit your food preferences. Got it? Not the other way around where you have to consult your diabetes management plan for a diet. The food you eat plays a big role in intensive diabetes management. You need to know how much calories holds that or another food in order to be able to quantify your food intake. For example, a reasonable goal in your diabetes diet would be to get 10 to 20% of all calories from protein and less than 10% from saturated fat. The remaining calories should be derived from carbohydrates and monosaturated fats. Also, 20 to 35 grams per day of fiber and less than 3,000 milligrams of sodium per day are recommended for consumption.

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Intensive Diabetes Management for Type 2 Diabetes

The way person with type 2 diabetes follows reaching blood glucose goals can differ from someone with type 1 diabetes. It will take a bit of trial and error on the path to figure out what does work best. Almost all people with diabetes can gain benefits from keeping blood glucose levels close to normal levels of people without diabetes. The blood glucose goals for a person with type 2 diabetes who wants to jump on intensive diabetes management to reap benefits of this plan are not much different that for people with type 1 diabetes.

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Insulin Regimens in Intensive Diabetes Management

Intensive diabetes management include testing blood glucose levels four or more times each day; injecting insulin three to four times a day or the use of insulin pump; adjusting insulin doses according to food intake, exercise, and blood glucose level. It also include following a special diabetes diet and exercise plan.

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Intensive Diabetes Management for Type 1 Diabetes

The idea behind intensive diabetes management is to maintain tight control over blood glucose levels. It is not enough to check blood glucose levels twice a day and inject insulin twice a day same time every day. For intensive diabetes management of type 1 diabetes you will ne to check your blood glucose levels five to seven (or even more) times per day and you will need to use multiple daily injections of fast-acting or regular insulin or an insulin pump.

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